Love is an irresistible desire to be desired.

There's more to this blog than you can understand so let it say everything but nothing of the colored rainbow above shadowed windows in this desolate light of love.
hadaes:

lagoonist:

hadaes:

likeafieldmouse:

The Monet Room

when i was there i was gob-smacked; the monet room is made up of multiple “sub-rooms” with different paintings that make up one specific sighting - it has a very serene atmosphere and the paintings are gigantic! 

when I was there I got kicked out for taking photos


i nearly got kicked out as well and i was like ”no m’am just checking my phone hahaha friends hahaha texting hahahahha social life while contemplating monet”

hadaes:

lagoonist:

hadaes:

likeafieldmouse:

The Monet Room

when i was there i was gob-smacked; the monet room is made up of multiple “sub-rooms” with different paintings that make up one specific sighting - it has a very serene atmosphere and the paintings are gigantic! 

when I was there I got kicked out for taking photos

i nearly got kicked out as well and i was like ”no m’am just checking my phone hahaha friends hahaha texting hahahahha social life while contemplating monet”

(via funeral-singers)

If someone were to die at the age of 63 after a lifelong battle with MS or Sickle Cell, we’d all say they were a “fighter” or an “inspiration.” But when someone dies after a lifelong battle with severe mental illness and drug addiction, we say it was a tragedy and tell everyone “don’t be like him, please seek help.” That’s bullshit. Robin Williams sought help his entire life. He saw a psychiatrist. He quit drinking. He went to rehab. He did this for decades. That’s HOW he made it to 63. For some people, 63 is a fucking miracle. I know several people who didn’t make it past 23 and I’d do anything to have 40 more years with them.

anonymous reader on The Dish

One of the more helpful and insightful things I’ve seen about depression/suicide in the last couple of days.

(via mysweetetc)

(via princessonthesteeple)

atlasobscura:

Cabinet of Joseph Bonnier de La Mosson -Paris, France

The aristocrat Joseph Bonnier de La Mosson didn’t just inherit an incredible fortune, he also inherited a lavish residence with the Hôtel du Lude on the ritzy Boulevard Saint-Germain. With an intense interest in science, it was there he created his cabinet of curiosity, which encompassed objects related to anatomy, chemistry, physics, mechanical devices, optic machines, fine art, and natural history, many of which he collected on his world travels.

The cabinet was widely visited by likeminded learners and immortalized in a painting by Jacques de Lajoue. Yet when its creator died in 1744 he was destitute. His widow resorted to selling it off in pieces. The carefully carved wooden cabinets, with details of winding reptiles and flourishing flora, that focused on natural history were all purchased by the naturalist Buffon for the Jardin du Roi, which is now the Jardin des Plantes which houses the médiathèque and the complex of natural history museums. Other parts of the collection ended up at the Lycée Alain-Fournier.

The cabinets were declared historic monuments in 1979 and were restored between 1985 and 1994.

atlasobscura:

THE LONG ROOM LIBRARY AT TRINITY COLLEGE -DUBLIN, IRELAND

Built between 1712 and 1732, the Long Room at Trinity College’s Old Library holds the collection’s 200,000 oldest books. The enormous collection housed in the long room includes a rare copy of the 1916 Proclamation of the Irish Republic and the 15th-century wooden harp in the library which is the model for the emblem of Ireland. 

The distinctive and beautiful barrel ceiling was added in 1860 to allow space for more works when the existing shelves became full. Marble busts of famous philosophers and writers line the central walkway of the nearly 200-foot-long room, created by sculptor Peter Schemakers beginning in 1743.

Discover more of the historic gems held in this beautiful library at Atlas Obscura…

atlasobscura:

THE COLOSSUS OF VILLA DEMIDOFF -VAGLIA, ITALY

Commissioned by Francesco I de’ Medici in the 16th century Villa Demidoff and the nearby Villa di Pratolino took over 12 years to complete. The end result was a stunning near-labyrinth of natural caves, lakes and massive sculptures. Of the statuary, the 16th century “Appennine Colossus,” is the main focal point of the landscape. Hesits atop a grotto in apparent anguish at his fate.

After changing hands a few more times, the wild grounds eventually fell into the hands of the government of Florence, who operated the area as a public park during the spring and summer months.

To learn more of the beauty and mystery of these gardens visit Atlas Obscura